European car sales analysis June and first half 2017 – brands

Toyota_CHR-auto-sales-statistics-EuropeToyota is the big volume winner among brands in June, followed by Fiat and Peugeot, the former of which builds on continuous demand for its 500 minicar, but increasingly on the success of the Tipo compact car. Peugeot scores nicely with its new crossovers 3008 and 5008. In the short term, PSA might regret its acquisition of Opel/Vauxhall, as it’s the fastest declining brand in Europe at double the volume lost of the next loser, BMW. PSA’s luxury brand DS has become a mainstay in the losers aisle this year and shows no signs of improvement anytime soon, unless the upcoming crossover DS7 Crossback proves to be a big hit. The rest of the already aging line-up will have to make do for a few more years, as only one new model launch is planned per year. In terms of relative growth, both Chevrolet (mostly Camaros and Corvettes) and Cadillac (mostly Escalades) more than double up, while Lotus, now under the flag of Volvo owner Geely, also shows a nice growth. Besides DS, we also find Lamborghini and Infiniti among the relative losers. For the latter, the Q30/QX30 duo which has been designed to put the brand on the map in Europe, has now officially and solidly flopped.

June winners and losers

Brand biggest volume increase Toyota 7.377   Brand biggest volume lost Opel/Vauxhall -8.325
Fiat 7.158 BMW -4.142
Peugeot 6.581 DS -3.090
Brand biggest % increase Chevrolet 135,5% Brand biggest % lost DS -40,6%
Cadillac 108,5% Lamborghini -33,6%
Lotus 65,4% Infiniti -32,2%

Peugeot_5008-auto-sales-statistics-EuropeAll top-4 brands decline in June, as Volkswagen naturally keeps its traditional leadership, followed by Renault. Ford takes third place, which was temporarily taken by Opel/Vauxhall last year. Peugeot is closing in quickly on its newly acquired sister brand, reducing a gap of more than 15.000 sales last year to less than 800 sales. BMW falls behind Mercedes-Benz and Fiat, the latter of which is the fastest growing brand in the top-10. Toyota moves past Citroën as the biggest winner in the top-15, while distancing Japanese rival Nissan. Dacia closes in on Hyundai, while Kia shows a rare loss in Europe. Kia is now seriously under fire from Seat, the biggest winner in the top-20. Suzuki outpaces Mazda and jumps into the top-20, while Honda is in danger of falling behind Mitsubishi. Jeep has lost steam now the Renegade is no longer brand new, but the new generation Compass should revitalize the brand again. Alfa Romeo is hte fastest growing brand in the top-30 thanks to the Giulia and Stelvio, almost doubling the volume of sister brand Lancia, which takes a big hit. DS barely stays ahead of perennial wallflower Lexus, and Telsa almost outsells Subaru.

June brands ranking

  Brand June-17 June-16 change 2017 share 2016 share
1 Volkswagen 163.350 164.304 -0,6% 10,8% 11,0%
2 Renault 132.893 133.395 -0,4% 8,8% 8,9%
3 Ford 97.833 100.793 -2,9% 6,4% 6,7%
4 Opel/Vauxhall 93.163 101.488 -8,2% 6,1% 6,8%
5 Peugeot 92.343 85.762 7,7% 6,1% 5,7%
6 Mercedes-Benz 86.007 81.073 6,1% 5,7% 5,4%
7 Fiat 81.337 74.179 9,6% 5,4% 5,0%
8 BMW 78.578 82.720 -5,0% 5,2% 5,5%
9 Audi 73.914 75.458 -2,0% 4,9% 5,0%
10 Skoda 67.499 64.911 4,0% 4,4% 4,3%
11 Toyota 61.332 53.955 13,7% 4,0% 3,6%
12 Citroën 58.240 57.040 2,1% 3,8% 3,8%
13 Nissan 53.757 51.067 5,3% 3,5% 3,4%
14 Hyundai 48.099 47.073 2,2% 3,2% 3,1%
15 Dacia 47.434 42.761 10,9% 3,1% 2,9%
16 Kia 40.452 41.304 -2,1% 2,7% 2,8%
17 Seat 40.014 33.978 17,8% 2,6% 2,3%
18 Volvo 29.238 29.176 0,2% 1,9% 2,0%
19 Mini 24.003 24.249 -1,0% 1,6% 1,6%
20 Suzuki 22.295 19.160 16,4% 1,5% 1,3%
21 Mazda 21.558 23.104 -6,7% 1,4% 1,5%
22 Land Rover 14.071 14.011 0,4% 0,9% 0,9%
23 Honda 12.248 14.823 -17,4% 0,8% 1,0%
24 Mitsubishi 11.270 10.657 5,8% 0,7% 0,7%
25 Smart 9.288 10.797 -14,0% 0,6% 0,7%
26 Jeep 9.272 9.871 -6,1% 0,6% 0,7%
27 Alfa Romeo 9.034 6.716 34,5% 0,6% 0,4%
28 Porsche 7.227 5.793 24,8% 0,5% 0,4%
29 Jaguar 6.064 6.689 -9,3% 0,4% 0,4%
30 Lancia 4.630 5.763 -19,7% 0,3% 0,4%
31 DS 4.513 7.603 -40,6% 0,3% 0,5%
32 Lexus 4.093 4.049 1,1% 0,3% 0,3%
33 Subaru 3.004 3.416 -12,1% 0,2% 0,2%
34 Tesla 2.962 1.792 65,3% 0,2% 0,1%
35 SSangYong 1.642 1.905 -13,8% 0,1% 0,1%
36 Infiniti 1.253 1.848 -32,2% 0,1% 0,1%
37 Maserati 885 687 28,8% 0,1% 0,0%
38 Lada 497 438 13,5% 0,0% 0,0%
39 Bentley 366 322 13,7% 0,0% 0,0%
40 Chevrolet 358 152 135,5% 0,0% 0,0%
41 SAIC MG 314 336 -6,5% 0,0% 0,0%
42 Ferrari 288 307 -6,2% 0,0% 0,0%
43 Aston Martin 211 146 44,5% 0,0% 0,0%
44 Cadillac 123 59 108,5% 0,0% 0,0%
45 Lamborghini 93 140 -33,6% 0,0% 0,0%
46 Lotus 86 52 65,4% 0,0% 0,0%
47 Rolls Royce 59 78 -24,4% 0,0% 0,0%
48 Dodge 56 80 -30,0% 0,0% 0,0%
49 DR 46 35 31,4% 0,0% 0,0%
50 Mahindra 33 41 -19,5% 0,0% 0,0%
51 Geely 18 9 0,0% 0,0%
52 Bugatti 1   0,0% 0,0%

 
Mercedes-Benz-A-Class-auto-sales-statistics-EuropeThanks to its solid performance in June, Toyota steals the crown of biggest winner in the first half from Mercedes-Benz, with Fiat a close third. All three brands add more than 40.000 sales and when combined can be credited with 43% of the European market growth. On the other end of the scale, DS, Opel/Vauxhall and Honda each lose more than 10.000 sales, which for DS means a loss of almost 37% of its volume. Mahindra, which sells just a handful of cars a month in a few European countries, also shrinks hard, as does Dodge, which until recently didn’t have an official importer for Europe and was only available through grey-market imports. However, in order to bring more structure to its low-volume representation, FCA has now appointed not one but two official importers of Dodge and RAM vehicles. Of these, RAM will take the bulk of the volume with its pick-up truck, while Dodge may find some popularity for its Hellcat versions of the Charger and Challenger in Europe, now that demand in the US has peaked.

2017 first half winners and losers

Brand biggest volume increase Toyota 49.405   Brand biggest volume lost DS -14.604
Mercedes-Benz 47.026 Opel/Vauxhall -14.223
Fiat 45.370 Honda -11.904
Brand biggest % increase Tesla 98,4% Brand biggest % lost DS -36,8%
Aston Martin 91,2% Mahindra -28,1%
Chevrolet 67,5% Dodge -19,4%

 

Ford_Fiesta-auto-sales-statistics-EuropeIn the first half of 2017, Volkswagen loses half a percentage point of market share but remains ultra dominant. The brand seems completely unphased by the diesel scandal in the US and even by the reports of collusion and price fixing between the German automakers. It helps of course that VW has a firm grip on corporate sales in some of Europe’s most important markets, which all but guarantees a steady stream of orders. Renault consolidates its #2 position, outgrowing Ford which may start to catch up when the new Fiesta hits full steam, but that may be too little, too late to reclaim second place by the end of the year. Meanwhile, Opel/Vauxhall is falling further behind since the take-over by PSA, as sister brand Peugeot has slashed the gap in half. Mercedes-Benz and Fiat both gain around 11% and kick down Audi into 8th place, while BMW remains #3 of the German luxury brands. Skoda holds on to its top-10 position by the skin of its teeth, as Toyota has closed in to 17 sales, helped by the successful launch of the C-HR crossover. The bottom end of the top-15 is relatively stable, although Dacia is closing in on Kia after a slow June for the South-Korean brand. Suzuki has switched places with Mazda and Smart has fallen behind Jeep. Alfa Romeo now outsells Porsche and has distanced Jaguar, not to mention sister brand Lancia. Further down below, Aston Martin outsells Ferrari and if it keeps that up until the end of the year, it will be the first time in exactly a decade that it will do so.

First half brands ranking

  Brand 2017 change 2017 share 2016 share 2016 rank
1 Volkswagen 898.415 -0,4% 10,7% 11,2% 1
2 Renault 616.748 4,1% 7,4% 7,4% 2
3 Ford 578.787 2,5% 6,9% 7,0% 3
4 Opel/Vauxhall 522.090 -2,7% 6,2% 6,7% 4
5 Peugeot 494.891 3,6% 5,9% 5,9% 5
6 Mercedes-Benz 472.420 11,1% 5,6% 5,3% 7
7 Fiat 459.412 11,0% 5,5% 5,2% 9
8 Audi 439.872 -0,4% 5,3% 5,5% 6
9 BMW 432.498 2,0% 5,2% 5,3% 8
10 Skoda 364.076 5,4% 4,4% 4,3% 10
11 Toyota 364.059 15,7% 4,4% 3,9% 11
12 Citroën 320.731 3,6% 3,8% 3,9% 12
13 Nissan 312.246 5,0% 3,7% 3,7% 13
14 Hyundai 264.608 2,7% 3,2% 3,2% 14
15 Kia 242.304 5,7% 2,9% 2,9% 15
16 Dacia 240.791 9,6% 2,9% 2,7% 16
17 Seat 210.450 16,5% 2,5% 2,2% 17
18 Volvo 160.224 8,0% 1,9% 1,8% 18
19 Suzuki 124.829 22,9% 1,5% 1,3% 21
20 Mazda 119.287 -5,7% 1,4% 1,6% 19
21 Mini 110.658 2,5% 1,3% 1,3% 20
22 Land Rover 92.873 0,9% 1,1% 1,1% 22
23 Honda 76.781 -13,4% 0,9% 1,1% 23
24 Mitsubishi 61.145 -4,0% 0,7% 0,8% 24
25 Jeep 53.716 -1,9% 0,6% 0,7% 26
26 Smart 52.834 -9,4% 0,6% 0,7% 25
27 Alfa Romeo 46.333 40,2% 0,6% 0,4% 30
28 Porsche 40.309 10,3% 0,5% 0,5% 29
29 Jaguar 40.175 25,3% 0,5% 0,4% 31
30 Lancia 37.316 -7,1% 0,4% 0,5% 27
31 DS 25.054 -36,8% 0,3% 0,5% 28
32 Lexus 22.512 -0,6% 0,3% 0,3% 32
33 Subaru 18.090 -8,0% 0,2% 0,2% 33
34 Tesla 11.974 98,4% 0,1% 0,1% 36
35 SSangYong 9.697 -4,9% 0,1% 0,1% 34
36 Infiniti 7.721 11,9% 0,1% 0,1% 35
37 Maserati 5.562 67,2% 0,1% 0,0% 37
38 Lada 2.523 28,8% 0,0% 0,0% 38
39 Bentley 2.139 24,4% 0,0% 0,0% 41
40 SAIC MG 1.994 5,1% 0,0% 0,0% 39
41 Aston Martin 1.595 91,2% 0,0% 0,0% 43
42 Ferrari 1.556 -10,7% 0,0% 0,0% 40
43 Chevrolet 1.412 67,5% 0,0% 0,0% 42
44 Lamborghini 501 -3,5% 0,0% 0,0% 44
45 Cadillac 489 33,6% 0,0% 0,0% 46
46 Lotus 448 14,0% 0,0% 0,0% 45
47 Rolls Royce 388 9,0% 0,0% 0,0% 47
48 Dodge 282 -19,4% 0,0% 0,0% 48
49 DR 231 -7,6% 0,0% 0,0% 50
50 Mahindra 217 -28,1% 0,0% 0,0% 49
51 Geely 123 778,6% 0,0% 0,0% 52
52 Bugatti 6 100,0% 0,0% 0,0% 53
53 Great Wall 3 -93,3% 0,0% 0,0% 51

European car sales statistics are from the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom. They exclude vehicles registered as commercial vehicles. Source: ANDC, JATO Dynamics

About Bart Demandt

Bart is a 36-year old Dutchman who's always had a thing for cars, the automotive industry and statistics. He’s combined these passions by writing about them on CarSalesBase.com. His daily driver is an Alfa Romeo GT 3.2 V6 which he just can't seem to say goodbye to thanks to the mesmerizing exhaust note.
You can find all his articles Here.

Comments

  1. “PSA might regret its acquisition”:

    July is even better for PSA but like June less for Opel. Sales of Vauxhall almost halved i/t UK! Let’s hope it’s a temporary dip.

    BTW, it’s an acquisition alright, but fact is Opel/Vauxhall was offered by GM to PSA. Hence the extremely low price.

  2. I don’t know about PSA, Opel or skyfalling numbers of Honda, but there is one brand, one company, which will most probably never disappear. With over 375 000 000 sales globally during past 114 years, Ford is the biggest manufacturer in the world (as a whole). Yes, Ford is not as reliable as Toyota, not as safety as Volvo, not as comfortable as Citroen, not as luxury as Mercedes, and not as eco-friendly as Tesla, but for unknown for me reason almost all around the world people accpet it as local brand. For Americans it is American, which it actually is. For Britains it’s British, for Germans is German, for Europeans is European, even for Turks is Turkish, because of the Transit’s production there. And for one or anthoer reason people buy it:
    1. Best selling full-size pick-up truck in the world -> F-Series over 36 million sales (also second best selling vehicle after Corolla and before Civic);
    2. Best selling compat/city car in the world -> Fiesta over 17 million sales;
    3. Best selling cargo-van in the world -> Transit over 8 million sales;
    4. Best selling sportscar in the world -> Mustang over 9 million sales;
    5. Best selling mid-size/family SUV in the world -> Explorer over 9 million sales (also second best selling SUV of all times after CR-V);
    6. Second best selling compact pick-up truck in the world -> Ranger over 8 million sales (after Hilux);
    7. Second best selling full-size car in the world -> Crown Victoria almost 10 million sales (after Impala);
    (not to mention Escort – over 21 million and still best selling Ford model in China, Model T – over 16,5 million, Focus – over 13 million and one of only 3 cars, which has ever reached over 1 million sales during a single year);
    And now the new generations of Fiesta, Focus and Expedition, plus the coming launch of Bronco and Ranger in USA, the future for the Blue Oval is very bright, no matter if we like it or not! 🙂

  3. Losange says:

    Nice to see Fiat growing. Smart move to offer the Tipo as a budget model.

    I really can’t believe Mazda probably will be taken over by Mini within the next few months. What’s wrong with Europe?!

    DS (new brand with three old models plus a new luxury mid-sized SUV) is an easy target considering its decline, but the real brand in trouble in Europe is Honda. They offer more models and even have one brand new car in a popular segment (i.e. C segment Civic). In addition, the HR-V is still one of the fresh B segment crossovers, but it seems like these models aren’t able to turn around Honda’s free fall. Sadly for them they’re paying the price for neglecting the European customers for years.

  4. Martin C says:

    Germans just don’t buy French cars. Not even rebadged Opel cars. Sorry.

    • “Germans just don’t buy French cars. Not even rebadged Opel cars”

      The fact someone frolicsome demonstrates his inability to understand the numbers game is …. moving.
      Per year >300.000 Germans sign a purchase order for a French or Opel vehicle.

  5. NaBUru38 says:

    PSA didn’t buy Opel’s model line, it bought its dealership network.

    • ??

    • Bart Demandt says:

      What do you mean exactly, NaBUru38?

      • Have the same question. Curious to learn what I miss,
        For the manufacturer a dealership network is a margin eating expense (hence Tesla’s policy to do without)
        It’s on the vehicles a producer ideally makes money, share production costs etc.

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